From one of my academic heroes:
“Essentially all models are wrong, but some are useful.” – George P.E. Box
We’ll come to his point later in the post.
On Friday, we had the misfortune of having my wife rushed to the hospital for some health issues.  She is fine now, but my mind is always on, noticing other’s behaviors.  Our ER room was buzzing with doctors and nurses, asking many questions, and documenting all of it in their Epic system.  This is not my first time in an ER; however, this may be the first time I noticed a sales skill in action – or in this case, inaction.
As they were asking questions, no one seemed to be listening to the answer.  Only enough to document the response, but certainly not the meaning of what we were trying to convey.
In his book, How Doctors Think,  Jerome Groopman starts the book by asking you, the reader, in a doctor/patient consult, who has the most information about the issue and symptoms?  You guessed it! The patient.  They know everything about their illness, their feelings, etc.  Then Groopman quotes a study and asks the reader, again, how long it takes for the doctor, on average, to interrupt the patient speaking?
Think about it.  I’ll give you some time.
eighteen seconds If you said 18 seconds, you are right. Eighteen seconds for the doctor to start recommending solutions, telling what to do, and taking over the conversation.  Eighteen seconds.
If you said, 18 seconds, you are right.  Eighteen seconds for the doctor to start recommending solutions, telling what to do, and taking over the conversation.  Eighteen seconds.
Well, that is how I felt at the ER.  I’ll get over it, but now let’s learn.
Are you an eighteen second rep?  The customer knows everything about the issue and what they need.  How long does it take you to interrupt and start telling them about your thing? I look forward to doing a research study about exactly how long it is for reps to do that.  I’m not sure what the number is, but I bet is much lower than we think.