By now, if you are a reader, and I am assuming you are since you are here, you must have read Carol Dweck’s book, Mindset: The New Psychology of Success. If not, the boots like here are that to be successful; you need to have a growth mindset as sopped to a fixed mindset.  The rest of the blog will highlight why you should Measure Results but Praise Effort.
A growth mindset suggests that you can learn and do new things to expand your skills and achievement, while a fixed mindset means that you believe that you are who you are; that you have all of the skills that you will have for the rest of your life when you were born.
Now, that sounds depressing, but this sentiment was believed by many to be true over decades. For example, we believe (and many still do) that your IQ (Intelligence Quotient) is fixed; that is, you are intelligent as you will ever be. Well, you might be today year’s old, no it’s not, you can grow your intelligence. You are welcome.

Now, that sounds depressing, but this sentiment was believed by many to be true over decades. For example, we believe (and many still do) that your IQ (Intelligence Quotient) is fixed; that is, you are intelligent as you will ever be. Well, you might be today year’s old, no it’s not, you can grow your intelligence. You are welcome.

But wait, there is more…
How your parents and teachers spoke to you about your abilities might have contributed to you feeling this way. Dweck suggests that we are persuaded to have a fixed mindset when praised for being intelligent. A phrase like “you are so smart!” and “you are sharp” convey a fixed mindset — it suggests that you are who you are.
Deck suggests that we might want to restate these phrases from an effort point of view. For example, we might say to someone, “you are very persistent in getting the right answer,” or, “you are very resourceful!”. These items understand that their achievement came from their effort that can be learned and improved versus some immutable skill.
Deck suggests that we might want to restate these phrases from an effort point of view. For example, we might say to someone, “you are very persistent in getting the right answer,” or, “you are very resourceful!”. These items understand that their achievement came from their effort that can be learned and improved versus some immutable skill. Cover of Measure Results but Praise Effort
Start with yourself but remember others
I’m here to tell you that you are persistent and resourceful; you have a great desire to achieve — no. Begin to say to yourself that as well. However, don’t stop there, to the same to others. Learn new ways to praise achievement. This idea is not some substitute for accurate results, but it is a way to grow the likelihood that outcomes will improve on your team. Praise the effort of your teammates and supervisors and watch them all get better.
But don’t stop there; praise your customers’ efforts as well. Watch them take on more, engage with you in new challenges, and succeed in new endeavors with you to create meaningful and lasting change.
At the Sales Conservatory, we have a top-rated series of courses as part of our Literary Series where we read together books like Dweck’s Mindset and implement them in a sales context.
If you are looking for this kind of gem in books and many other advanced techniques as a sales professional, be sure to visit The Sales Conservatory Platform and sign up for a free seven-day trial.
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